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left to make a deal before the country hits what's called the fiscal cliff. that's a combination of across the board tax increases for everyone, coupled with cuts in spending like defense, education, health care, and housing assistance. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin with the very latest. jessica? >> reporter: president obama has now personally turned down speaker boehner's opening offer to avert the fiscal cliff. he did it in a tv interview. what does president obama think of speaker boehner's proposal to avert the fiscal cliff? >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about $800 billion worth of revenues but says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: he won't agree to eliminate a tax deduction for contributions to charity. >> every hospital and university and nonfor profit agency across the country would find themselves on the verge of collapse. so that's not a realistic option. >> reporter: but the president didn't say all this to speaker
dramatically higher interest rates because if they don't do a good deal for fiscal cliff and keep spending money, it's entirely possible this is going to be our come up -- >> the fed isn't big enough -- i thought i could count on rates below next year. >> i think demand is good. there will be a bit of inflation. people will be surprised. they ought to go get a mortgage now. they should be buying something now before that part of the economy heats up. housing stays strong. >> not europe. >> not europe. not asia. >> everyone is thinking about fiscal cliff. i have to go with i'm so worried about how many promises we've made in terms of $87 trillion of stuff we're not going to be able to afford and i am afraid we never, ever come to grips with it. >> that's why i think inflation is going to be an issue, joe, for exactly what you just said. kick the can does not last at 3% interest rates. it doesn't last. >> liesman is here. what's your -- he said if the jobless rate stays high is the biggest threat to 2013. why would the economy be bad? >> i'm worried about the long-term effect of joblessness
's the first part of the fiscal cliff. the second part of it is the spending decrease that this congress and the president agreed to the last summer to say we dramatically increase spending, we have to reduce that spending. that spending decrease that was agreed to had a deadline by the end of this year. if there didn't there would be across the board cuts. the house passed our spending decreases in may. the senate has yet to pass any. with that we're stuck with across-the-board cuts that will be in early january. and the tax rate for all americans. in 2001 and 2003 and then extended during the lame duck of 2010, every americans' tax rates were extended out to expire the 31st of december. every tax rate from the lowest to the highest is set to go up. some people see the problem is we're not taxing enough and so that solves the problem. to just go off the fiscal cliff and everyone will be taxed more. some say we don't take from some group and give to the other. some say go to the clinton tax rate. we had a booming economy and creating more jobs. if increasing taxes increases economic acti
now. the cliff is basically the expiration of the tax rates and the across the board spending cuts of about 9% across defense and all domestic spending. that is the fiscal cliff. we shouldn't be dealing with other issues that are long term in order to avert the cliff as it were. that is immediate crisis. we have long term situation --. bill: but you know when lawmakers get a little bit of rope, you know, when they get time to think about it and push it off to the next year, it never gets done. this budget proposal, there are many who wonder whether or not even democrats could support it. the last budget that came from the white house went to the senate, it went 98-0 against it. no one voted for it. melissa: well, that was kind of a tricky parliamentary issue as well but, i do take issue with one thing, the idea we haven't dealt with entightments. we had two years, a year and a half we debated medicare. we made significant changes in medicare. we just had a campaign which republicans including governor romney time after time after time charged that we had cut $616 billion in spendin
of the fiscal cliff discussions and sat down for lunch with former rival mitt romney. >> i am sure they will or have already compared experiences on the campaign trail. >> today president obama hits the road to push for his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republicans have slammed him for campaign-style politics that they say just won't get the job done. rob and sunny, back to you. >> can you really imagine that they're not going to reach some sort of deal to avoid the fiscal cliff? i mean that would be so unpopular across the nation. >> you would -- if you can take an action that would solve the problem for 98% of the country and then come back to the debate about the wealthiest 2%, let's get that first chunk done. republicans fear they could lose leverage if they cave in on the middle-class issue. apparently the president, his team has made increased demand here including, a provision now, part of the negotiations where, the congressional control over the debt limit would go away. and congress does not like to have its power take any way. so maybe the white house, upped the an
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5